Author Archives: stltourguide

About stltourguide

I am a walking tour and narrated coach tour guide in St. Louis, Missouri specializing in the history of the area.

Piecing a City Together: Recreating St. Louis

Great old cities, like great quilts can fray and fall to pieces. In order to remain vibrant they have to be revitalized. Cahokia, the first city on the landscape that became the greater St. Louis area, defined by archaeologists as the … Continue reading

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Expanding the Mosaic of St. Louis

Immigrants have proven to be the life-blood of the world’s great cities, infusing them not only with workers but a rich diversity of culture, talent and ways of thinking. For much of its 250 year history St. Louis was very much an immigrant … Continue reading

Posted in Happenings, History, Immigration in St. Louis, Neighborhoods, St. Louis | Tagged , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

The Wah-Zah-Zhi, People of the Middle Waters

Before the arrival of Europeans more than 560 tribal nations peopled the continental United States. There were no state boundaries or mapped delineations between them. The territorial distinctions between their ancestral lands were fluid, the inland waterways their highways. Their sages sang … Continue reading

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St. Lou’s Buried Treasures

Unlike the Gateway Arch, Union Station, the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis and the Chatillon-Demenil Mansion, some of the city’s greatest treasures lie underground. Chief among these from a public perspective are the limestone caves over which St. Louis evolved from … Continue reading

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The Founding Spirit of St. Louis

The City of St. Louis was founded in a spirit of collaboration, of tolerance among people of different races and socio-economic backgrounds, and of unprecedented freedom according to J. Frederick Fausz of the University of Missouri St. Louis.* This was … Continue reading

Posted in Colonial St. Louis, Happenings, History, St. Louis, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lighting the Birthday Candles

The City of St. Louis metaphorically lights 250 birthday candles next weekend in celebration of its founding in 1764 by Pierre Laclede Liguest and his fourteen-year-old stepson René Auguste Chouteau. A spirited re-enactment of Laclede’s landing in December of 1763 … Continue reading

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A Grand SLAM in Forest Park

A little over a week ago on June 30, 2013 the Director, Board of Directors, Curators and Staff of the St. Louis Art Museum hit a collective Grand Slam inside Forest Park when they unlocked the doors to the new … Continue reading

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Belated Valentine for Pierre Laclede

Cher Monsieur Laclede, Dear Pierre, On this the 249th anniversary of the founding of La Poste de Saint Louis, I want to thank you. And to tell you  how much has been accomplished in your absence – knowing how great … Continue reading

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Darkness and Light: October in The Lou

According to the ancient Celts of Ireland when the moon rises on Samhain (sow-en), to most of the world today Halloween, the doors between the worlds – this world and the Otherworld – swing wide open. The dead and all … Continue reading

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Chatillon-DeMenil: Grande Dame of The Lou’s Great Houses

It’s not the oldest house in St. Louis. Nor the most prestigious. But the Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion (http://www.demenil.org/ ) is the last of the great Creole houses – front and back – and it resonates St. Louis history from our founding … Continue reading

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